Kate Garraway – The Matrix Database

Kate Garraway with husband Derek Draper, a controversial political lobbyist who once boasted “there are 17 people who count. And to say I am intimate with every one of them is the understatement of the century”.

The Matrix Project is an effort to document personal factors that undermine powerful journalists’ claims of objectivity and impartiality. Are factors such as an elite education, establishment connections, personal wealth and interests in rival fields compatible with journalistic integrity? 

This page looks at GMB journalist Kate Garraway. For more information on the database click here.

Education

Learn about the significance of a private/Oxbridge education here

Kate Garraway attended state schools and a non-Oxbridge university (Bath)

Revolving Door

Learn about the significance of the Revolving Door here

Kate Garraway has no significant experience working in rival fields to the media

“Establishment” Connections

Learn about the significance of Establishment Connections here

Primary

Kate Garraway was married to her boss at ITV News Meridian, Ian Rumsey, from 1998-2002 (source)

Kate Garraway is currently married to former journalist and political lobbyist Derek Draper, who was involved in not one but two high-profile political scandals. In 1998 Draper resigned from his role as a lobbyist for GPC Market Access (source) after the “lobbygate” scandal, in which he claimed that “There are 17 people who count. And to say I am intimate with every one of them is the understatement of the century.” (source) Draper was referring to Tony Blair’s government. Both Tony Blair and Peter Mandelson (for whom Draper worked as a political aide) found themselves under particular scrutiny following the revelations.

In 2009, shortly after a return to the political arena, Draper found himself embroiled in another scandal when he described as “absolutely totally brilliant Damian” an idea to use a blog linked to the Labour List website (which he founded) as a platform for sleazy stories designed to destabilise the Tories. The stories in question included, according to The Times, “to spread gossip that (David Cameron) may have suffered from a sexually transmitted disease” and that Nadine Dorries had a one-night stand with a married colleague (and left a sex aid at the hotel). The revelations led to the resignation of Damian McBride, a prominent aide to Gordon Brown, and to Draper’s departure from Labour List.

Secondary

Kate Garraway counts a number of celebrities as friends, many of them I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here camp mates, according to this Mirror article (backed up with quotes from Garraway herself) on assistance offered to Kate in the aftermath of severe health problems suffered by her husband as a result of COVID-19. They include: Jeremy Kyle, Roman Kemp, Martin Kemp, Judge Rinder and Myleene Klass. Kate is also said to be good friends with former/present GMB colleagues Piers Morgan and Susana Reid (source 1, source 2). See the Matrix entry for Kay Burley for the potentially compromising effects of such friendships in the media.

Salary/Indications of Wealth

Learn about the significance of journalists with an unusual level of wealth here

In 2019 Kate Garraway’s salary was reported to be in the region of £540,000 (as per the Evening Standard).

As a point of reference, the Office for National Statistics list the average UK salary for 2021 as £26,193

Complaints / apologies / controversies

Learn about the significance of complaints/apologies here

None

Summary

Kate Garraway reputedly takes home 20 times the salary of the average Briton and is married to an influential and highly controversial political lobbyist. She has a notable number of close friendships in media and celebrity circles.

Impartial? Independent? Holding the powerful to account?

Learn more about the Matrix Project here.

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